17 Feb
Floating Deeper
Written by Lesley Crossingham |
 
Font size decrease font size increase font size
Rate this item
(1 Vote)
All spiritual pathways recommend meditation as a regular spiritual practice. Meditation is, in essence, a quietening of the mind to allow deep connection with the eternal essence or soul. This might also include receiving guidance and messages from the angels or spiritual masters. Or it could mean simply bathing in the quiet gentles of non-thinking and deep restfulness.
 
So many people claim that meditation is extremely difficult because of the habit most of us have of constantly thinking or planning something. The essence of meditation is to allow the mind to settle into a state of “calm abiding,” where it will find peace and stability, and can rest in the state of non-distraction, which is ultimately what meditation really is. So let us examine some of the basic components of meditation.
 
 
When a person first begins to meditate it is advisable to use an item for support. You might, for example, gaze at an object or an image of Buddha, or Christ, or even a crystal or a flower. You might simply prefer to lightly and mindfully watch the breath. The great Meditation Masters always advise us not to fixate too much while practising the concentration of calm abiding.
 
 
They recommend you place only 25 percent of your attention on mindfulness of the breath because mindfulness alone is not enough. While you are supposed to be watching the breath, after a few minutes you may find yourself daydreaming or thinking about the day ahead. So another 25 percent should be devoted to a continuous vigilance or watchful awareness. That means that you oversee and check whether you are being mindful of the breath. The remaining 50 percent of your attention is left abiding, spaciously.
 
 
 
The exact percentages are not as important as the fact that all three of these elements — mindfulness, vigilance and spaciousness— are present.
 
 
Gradually, as you are able to rest your mind naturally in a state of non-distraction, you will no longer need the support of an image or the breath. Even though you are not particularly focusing on anything, there is still some presence of mind, that may be loosely described as a “centre of awareness.”This focused and un-distracted presence of mind is the best way of integrating your meditation into everyday life, while you are walking or eating or caring for others — whatever the situation.
 
 
 
When you bring conscious awareness to your activities, distractions and anxieties will gradually disappear, and your mind will become more peaceful. It will also bring you a certain stability within yourself and a certain confidence with which you can face life and the complexity of the world with composure, ease and humour.
 
 
Yet another profound way of describing meditation is this: allowing yourself to be simply and clearly present in the face of whatever thoughts, sensations or emotions arise. The secret is where exactly your mind is: whether you are lost in the appearances of mind — the thoughts and emotions — or whether you are resting in the essence of mind — in your real nature, in your true being.
 
 
Through meditation, when you reach the state of transcendence, you simply rest, as much as you can, in the nature of mind, this most natural state which is without any reference or concept, hope or fear, yet with a quiet but soaring confidence, the deepest form of well-being imaginable. As the cloudlike thoughts and emotions fade away, the sky-like nature of your true being is revealed, and, shining from it, your true nature, like the sun. And just as both light and warmth blaze from the sun, wisdom and loving compassion radiate out from the mind’s innermost nature.
 
 
As we connect with the purity of our inherent nature through meditation practice, what is revealed is our fundamental goodness, our good heart. Kindness, compassion and love simply exude. And the more we integrate the practice mindfully in our lives, the more we will find that not only are we in touch with ourselves, but completely in touch with others. The barrier between ourself and others dissolves. Negativity is defused, there comes a self-forgiveness, and all the harm in us is removed, so that we become truly useful and able to be of service to others.
 
 
So many people claim that meditation is extremely difficult because of the habit most of us have of constantly thinking or planning something. The essence of meditation is to allow the mind to settle into a state of “calm abiding,” where it will find peace and stability, and can rest in the state of non-distraction, which is ultimately what meditation really is. So let us examine some of the basic components of meditation.
 
 

Lesley Crossingham

 

 

Lesley Ann is a spiritual artist, an author of over twenty books, clairvoyant and spiritual teacher. She was awarded our Find Your Psychic Spiritual Author of the Year award for the past five years due to her many popular spiritual book titles.

 

Lesley has written over twenty books, numerous magazine articles and many short stories. She has also created three CDs of her music and spiritual meditations. She introduced traditional Native American Indian drummaking to Australia in 1991 and continues to offer these workshops.

 

Lesley writes for several magazines, including New Dawn where she contributes book reviews. You can also read her many book reviews on Amazon's website. Lesley has a journalism background and brings her many skills to writing articles on this site and many others.

 

For further information on Lesley, to contact her, purchase her books, readings or CDs, please go to her website -

www.spiritvision.com.au

 

 

Lesley Crossingham